Life

Dorm Living

Independence. Responsibility. Community. Fun. Living in a dorm with your friends nearby has a lot of upsides. Excited to plan a club event? Your co-president is three doors down. Want to play a game of pick-up basketball or scrabble? There’s always someone around to go one-on-one.  Confused about a math problem? Check in with your math teacher who is on duty tonight. Guided by Webb faculty, students in the residential program discover their full capabilities, as they learn to manage their academics, care for themselves, and have a lot of fun in the process.

Student Life on Campus

Dorm Life Weekend Activities Drive In Movie
Campus Aerial of Dorms and Residential
Dorm Life Hammock and Parents
Dorm Life Student Activities Webb Days
Dorm Life Student Activities Webb Days
Student Activities Webb Idol
Community Dinner Dorm Life Student Activities

The Alamo

Built: 1936 (west wing), 1955 (east wing)

Updated: 1985, 2008, 2015

Square feet: 6,100

Rooms: 28

Use: WSC

Alamo dorm, a concrete and adobe structure, was built in two sections, starting with the west wing. It was named for its distinctive mission-style bell tower. it is the first dorm you see as you begin the walk up Gym Hill at the crossroads.

The Alamo

Built: 1936 (west wing), 1955 (east wing)

Updated: 1985, 2008, 2015

Square feet: 6,100

Rooms: 28

Use: WSC

Alamo dorm, a concrete and adobe structure, was built in two sections, starting with the west wing. It was named for its distinctive mission-style bell tower. it is the first dorm you see as you begin the walk up Gym Hill at the crossroads.

Appleby Dormitory

Built: 1980

Updated: 2007, 2021

Square feet: 11,200

Rooms: 34 singles

Use: VWS

Jerene Appleby – later Jerene Appleby Harnish – was publisher of the Ontario Daily Report (now the Inland Valley Daily Bulletin). She gave the building to Webb in gratitude for Thompson Webb’s enrolling her sons on trust when she was unable to advance the tuition. Her son, Carlton Appleby ’41, helped finance the gift. Originally built as 34 singles, the dormitory was converted to 17 double rooms. In 2021, it was remodeled again, restoring the original single-room plan.

Many of the changes were  driven by student suggestions, including installation of a new HVAC system, access to an outdoor community area and a porch with a view of the expansive Claremont hills.

The project was made possible through the generosity of Andrea and Blake Brown ’68, a Webb trustee.

Holt Hall

Built: 1965

Updated: 2001, 2011

Square feet: 6,222

Rooms: 20

Use: WSC

The dormitory is named for Mrs. Herbert B. Holt, mother of Martin B. Holt ’39, grandmother of Herbert B. Holt ’67 and aunt of Donald Bekins ’49. Mrs. Holt also helped finance the Alf Museum and the Health Center.

Hutch North and South

Built: 1987

Updated: 2011, 2019

Square feet: 11,720

Rooms: 30 double rooms

Use: 15 VWS (South) 15 WSC (North)

Hutchinson is typically divided in North Hutch and South Hutch. In addition to dorm rooms, the facility includes an art studio and a classroom. Murray and John Hutchinson gave this dormitory as a memorial to their mother, who died in 1973. The men are parents of boys who attended Webb. Murray Hutchinson was chairman of the Webb Board of Trustees from 1982-89 and has been a life trustee since 1990.

Sometimes referred simply as “The Hutches,” the dormitory is the one closest to Webb’s classrooms.

Frank Gard Jameson Hall

Built: 1959

Updated: 2006, 2012, 2015

Square feet: 5,010

Rooms: 30

Use: VWS

The hall is named for Frank Gard Jameson ’41, a prominent Southern California aeronautics industry executive and philanthropist. His son, Dr. F. Gard Jameson Jr., graduated from Webb in 1971. After graduating from Stanford in 1975, Dr. Jameson had a 25-year career in financial planning. He earned his Ph.D. in 2005 and turned to teaching Chinese and Indian philosophy. He is the author of Footprints on the Sands of Time, the story of his mentor, Webb’s Ray Alf. He serves on the Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology Board of Trustees.

Jones Dormitory

Built: 1965

Updated: 2010, 2015

Square feet: 9,090

Rooms: 13 singles, 7 doubles

Use: VWS

George F. Getty II ’42 attended Webb for three years and, at one time, served on the Board of Trustees. He made gifts toward this dormitory, the Health Center and a faculty residence in honor of his stepfather, William H. Jones.

McLeod Hall

Built: 1966

Updated: 2007, 2010

Square feet: 7,241

Rooms: 17 singles, 3 doubles

Use: WSC

The dormitory was named for Martha Harris MacLeod, who made a large gift to Webb in 1963. The hall was dedicated two years later. Mrs. MacLeod’s son, Norman McLeod Jr., graduated from Webb in 1940.

Kirkhill Hall

Built: 1970

Updated: 1995, 2001

Square feet: 3,850

Rooms: 16

Use: WSC

The Webb trustees voted to name this dormitory to honor T. Kirk Hill, founder of Kirkhill Rubber Company. Hill was a friend and neighbor of Thompson Webb, served as the first president of the Board of Trustees and was long associated with The Webb Schools.

Reynolds Dormitory

Built: 1970

Updated: 1995, 2009

Square feet: 2,170

Rooms: 12

Use: WSC

This dormitory honors the Robert O. Reynolds, a business leader and father of three Webb graduates, Chris ’61, Dan ’63 and Kirk ’70. Robert Reynolds was president to the Board of Trustees from 1960 to 1962 and chairman of the board from 1962 to 1967. Dan became a Webb trustee and his wife, Cece, was president of the Affiliates.

Ruddick Room

Built: 1965

Updated: 2017

Square Feet: 1,543

This room in the dormitory complex that includes McLeod, Kirkhill, Reynolds and Holt dormitories was named for Harold Ruddick, father of Bill Ruddick ’49 and an original Webb trustee. For years, he had wanted a common room for the boys. After his death, his wife gave the school 250 acres in Apple Valley, which was sold to finance the room.

Today, the room includes a pool table, vending machines, couches and a TV.

Ruddick Room

Built: 1965

Updated: 2017

Square Feet: 1,543

This room in the dormitory complex that includes McLeod, Kirkhill, Reynolds and Holt dormitories was named for Harold Ruddick, father of Bill Ruddick ’49 and an original Webb trustee. For years, he had wanted a common room for the boys. After his death, his wife gave the school 250 acres in Apple Valley, which was sold to finance the room.

Today, the room includes a pool table, vending machines, couches and a TV.